Archive for the ‘cuisine’ Category

An Evening at Cook’n With Class

Sunday, March 25th, 2018
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Cook'n with Class

Cook’n with Class
Photograph by Discover Paris!

I recently had the occasion to participate in a private cooking class at Cook’n with Class, a cooking school in Paris’ 18th arrondissement that was opened in 2007 by French chef Eric Fraudeau. Six persons participated: husband and wife team Tanzets and Ariqa Islam from New York, Andrea Campbell from California, mother and daughter team Nicole and Daven Pembrook from Paris, and me. The class was led by Patrick Hebert, a French chef who speaks fluent English and who has considerable experience in the restaurant industry.

Tanzets and Ariqa Islam, Andrea Campbell, and Patrick Hebert

Tanzets and Ariqa Islam, Andrea Campbell, and Patrick Hebert
Photograph by Discover Paris!

We met at 5:00 p.m. at place Jules Joffrin and proceeded to the neighborhood market, where Patrick helped us select the products that we would transform into a delicious meal. We stopped at several stores, including a bakery where we purchased fresh-baked baguettes; a butcher shop where we decided to purchase quail for our main course; a green grocer where we purchased fennel and small potatoes; a fish market where we purchased scallops and mussels for our starter; and a cheese shop where we purchased several cheeses for the cheese course. For dessert, we decided to bake lava cakes for which Patrick already had the ingredients back at the school.

How to Recognize a Fresh Scallop

Patrick Explains How to Recognize a Fresh Scallop
Photograph by Discover Paris!

At each shop, Patrick took care to explain how to select the best products for a meal. At the bakery, we learned that a baker only has the right to call his shop “artisanal” if his products are made on the premises (and not, for example, produced off the premises and delivered to the shop for retail sale). At the butcher shop, we learned that the Label Rouge is a sign of quality for agricultural products. At the fish market, we learned that the shop should “smell like the sea,” and not have a fishy odor. We also learned that fish should be moist to the touch and that some fish, such as the monk fish, should be slimy.

We arrived at the school, washed our hands, donned aprons, and then assembled around a large table. Each of us had a cutting board to work on, as well as a metal bowl for scraps and a sharp knife for slicing.

Patrick with Menu

Patrick with Menu
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Patrick opened the class by posting the menu of items that we had selected for our meal. For the starter, we would have scallops and mussels with lemongrass sauce and candied fennel; for the main course, roasted quail in red wine sauce with Brussels sprouts and baby potatoes. These would be followed by a cheese platter and chocolate lava cake.

A scrumptious meal was in store for us! Were we up to the challenge of preparing it?

Patrick Shows Daven Pembrook How to Set Scale to Zero

Patrick Shows Daven Pembrook How to Set Scale to Zero
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Andrea Campbell and Chef Patrick Prepare Lava Cake Batter

Andrea Campbell and Chef Patrick Prepare Lava Cake Batter
Photograph by Discover Paris!

We got to work, beginning with the lava cake because it had to be refrigerated for an hour before we baked it. To measure the ingredients, Patrick showed us how to use a scale. First, the “tare weight” was set to zero with an empty bowl on it. Then the ingredients were weighed, and Patrick showed us how to prepare the individual cake tins to receive the batter.

Once the batter was in the cake tins and the tins were in the refrigerator, we proceeded to prepare the mussels, the fennel, and the Brussels sprouts.

Tanzets Islam Removes cooked Mussels from Their Shells

Tanzets Islam Removes Cooked Mussels from Their Shells
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Some of us sliced the fennel while others cleaned the mussels. Only closed mussels are supposed to be eaten, but if we came upon an open one, Patrick showed us a trick for determining whether it was fresh: squeeze gently on the upper and lower shell — if the mussel closes, then it is still alive, hence fresh. The cleaned mussels were placed in a pot with white wine, thyme, bay leaf, and shallots and cooked until they opened.

Nicole Pembrook Carefully Places Quail in Frying Pan

Nicole Pembrook Carefully Places Quail in Frying Pan
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Next, the quail were placed in a frying pan for browning on all sides. After this was accomplished, Patrick popped the frying pan into the oven for baking until the juices of the quail ran pale pink.

This was an evening of many firsts for me: the first time I had ever seen a frying pan used for baking, the first time I sliced fennel, the first time I helped prepare dark-chocolate lava cake with a secret white chocolate center…

Ariqa Islam Stirs the Sauce for the Scallops

Ariqa Islam Stirs the Sauce for the Scallops
Photograph by Discover Paris!

The mussels were cooked in white wine, the scallops were sautéed in olive oil, the Brussels sprouts were roasted, the baby potatoes were baked in their skins, the fennel was sautéed in olive oil, the quail were browned in a frying pan and then baked… Everything was ready!

We repaired to another room where Patrick talked about the two wines that he would serve with the meal. One was a rosé: Château Les Apiès – L’Arène de la Vallée 2015, from Provence, and the other was a red: Le Crouzet – Aude Côtes de Lastours 2015, from Languedoc. During our absence, a kitchen assistant cleared the work space and prepared the table for dinner.

The Starter

The Starter: Steamed Mussels, Caramelized Fennel, Sautéed Scallops
Photograph by Discover Paris!

When we returned, Patrick, Ariqa, and Andrea plated and served the first course: mussels steamed in white wine, caramelized fennel, and sautéed scallops in a sauce made from the liquid from steamed mussels, lemongrass, and cream. Bon appétit!

The Main Course

The Main Course: Baked Baby Potato, Roasted Brussels Sprouts, Roasted Quail, Sautéed Apple
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Our main course consisted of baked baby potatoes, roasted Brussels sprouts, baked quail in sauce made with Port wine and Muscat grape juice, and sautéed apples.

Cheese Board

Cheese Board
Clockwise from left: Sainte-Maure, Morbier, Pouligny Saint-Pierre, Cantal,
Fourme d’Ambert, Camembert, and Tomme du Barry

Photograph by Discover Paris!

Then came the cheese course consisting of Sainte-Maure, Morbier, Pouligny Saint-Pierre, Cantal, Fourme d’Ambert, Camembert, and Tomme du Barry flavored with tomato and olive.

Lava Cake

Lava Cake
Photograph by Discover Paris!

At some point, Patrick removed the lava cakes from the refrigerator and popped them into the oven. When they were done, he served them piping hot. I cut into mine to release its white chocolate lava, which flowed copiously onto the plate. Yum!

Eating a Fine Meal

Eating a Fine Meal
Photograph by Discover Paris!

The evening was an unqualified success. I met some great people, learned to prepare a delicious meal with them, and enjoyed their company as we sat down to savor the fruits of our labor. Thanks to Ariqa and Tanzets, Andrea, Nicole and Daven, and Patrick Hebert and the staff at Cook’n With Class!

Cook’n with Class
6 rue Baudelique
Paris 75018
www.cooknwithclass.com/paris

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Christina Huang in Istanbul

Monday, February 12th, 2018
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Christina Huang in Istanbul
Photograph courtesy of Michel Fortin

Christina Huang is chef and co-founder of Zaoka, a restaurant serving Taiwanese fusion cuisine near the popular Mouffetard street market in the 5th arrondissement of Paris. She was recently invited by the Cordon Bleu in Istanbul to give a talk on the topic of international gastronomy trends.

Huang graduated from the Cordon Bleu in Paris with a Grand Diplôme, a two-track program that trains students in both pastry and cuisine, in 2015. Following her graduation, she went on to found a restaurant that serves Taiwanese fusion cuisine. We dined there in mid-December 2017 and posted a review to our Paris Insights restaurant review page (sign in to gain access to the review).

Huang received a diploma in Chinese literature in her native Taiwan and went on to study management at a business school in London. She worked for a while in the fashion and luxury trade before realizing that her true calling was gastronomy. Consequently, she enrolled in the Grand Diplôme program at the Cordon Bleu. The rest is history!

Travelers to Paris will enjoy dining at Zaoka. Try the Gua Bao, a steamed bun containing tender, braised pork belly garnished with stir-fried pickled mustard greens and ground peanuts.

Bon appétit!

Zaoka
3, rue des Patriarches
75005 Paris
Open Wed 7:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. Thurs to Sat noon – 3:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.
Metro: Censier-Daubenton (Line 7)
Telephone: 06.67.59.67.82

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Raula Leustean of Les Trublions

Wednesday, October 25th, 2017
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Raula Leustean of Les Trublions

Raula Leustean
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Yesterday, I stopped by Les Trublions to reconfirm a dinner reservation that I had made with Raula Leustean, co-owner of the restaurant. My friends and I look forward to a fine meal there soon!

I wrote about Les Trublions in my book Dining Out in Paris. To learn more about the book, click here! http://amzn.to/219LraJ

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Macaron Secrets at Cook’n With Class

Monday, October 16th, 2017
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By Monique Y. Wells

Last Saturday, I had the distinct pleasure of attending a macaron class at Cook’n With Class – a cooking school in Paris’ 18th arrondissement.

Cook'n With Class Cooking School

Cook’n With Class Sign
Photograph by Discover Paris!

I won this class when I attended the school’s 10th anniversary party last month.

Macaron class at Cook'n With Class

Proudly displaying my Macaron Class gift certificate at Cook’n with Class
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Chef Sarah Tyler taught four other attendees – Nadine, Krystian, Sara, and Paola – and me how to make four varieties of this popular French dessert: rose, caramel beurre salée, pistachio, and fig.

In case you didn’t know, all macaron shells (the “cookie” part of the macaron) taste the same. What gives macarons their flavor is the filling. Macaron makers add coloring to the shells to help you anticipate the flavor of the filling!

As Chef Sarah instructed us on making both elements, she shared some surprising facts about macarons.

For example, did you know that the egg whites that go into the meringue should sit in the refrigerator for about a week before being used?

And that most macarons you buy in pastry shops, including the highest caliber ones, have been frozen?

Here are some photos that demonstrate a few of the steps required to make these scrumptious confections:

Making the macaron shells

One of the most important things to remember here is that MOISTURE IS THE ENEMY. You must be conscious of any additional liquid you may introduce, purposefully or inadvertently, because it can compromise the quality of your final product.

Making Macaron Shells_collage

Top:(left to right): Mixing powdered sugar and almond powder, making sugar syrup,
soft peak meringue, folding meringue into almond powder-sugar mixture
Bottom: Four colors of macaron batter

Photographs and collage by Discover Paris!

To make the pistachio shells look more appealing, we sprinkled them with crushed pistachios.

Piping batter_shells resting_collage

Left to right: Piping batter; pistachio and fig shells resting
Photographs and collage by Discover Paris!

Making the fillings

We made a fig jam, a salted butter caramel, and two ganaches from white chocolate to fill our macarons. We learned that ganaches need to set so that they become firm enough to pipe and that you should add their flavorings in small increments to avoid making them too strong.

Making Ganaches and Fig Jam

Top (left to right): Mixing pistachio ganache; adding salt to caramel ganache
Bottom (left to right): White chocolate and rose ganache; cutting figs for jam

Photographs and collage by Discover Paris!

Assembling the macarons

We decorated the caramel macaron shells with edible glitter and the rose macaron shells with a brush of red food coloring.

Chef Sarah explained that you must massage the bottom of each macaron to release it from the parchment paper. If you skip this step and try to lift the shells from the paper, you risk leaving much of the center attached to the paper.

Then you place the shells on a rack and match them for size.

After piping the filling onto a shell, you make the macaron “sandwich” by gently twisting the second shell onto the filling.

Assembling the macarons_collage

Top left: Brushing caramel macarons with edible glitter
Top right: Removing rose macaron shells from parchment paper
Bottom left: Piping ganache and assembling pistachio macarons
Bottom right: Creating the macaron “sandwich”

Photographs and collage by Discover Paris!

Chef Sarah and macarons

Chef Sarah and finished macarons
Photograph by Discover Paris!

This three-hour class was one of the most interesting and fun cooking adventures I’ve ever experienced. I highly recommend it!

Cook’n With Class
6 Rue Baudelique
75018 Paris
Telephone: (0)1 42 57 22 84
Internet: https://cooknwithclass.com/paris/

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Celebrating Ten Years with Cook’n With Class

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017
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Cook'n With Class founders

Eric Fraudeau and Yetunde Oshodi
Photographs by Discover Paris!

Our friends Eric Fraudeau and Yetunde Oshodi, founders of the cooking school Cook’n With Class, invited us to help them celebrate the ten-year anniversary of their school. The party was held in the evening of the last Thursday of September…and what a party it was!

Chefs at Cook'n With Class

Chefs Anton Gonzales and Eric Fraudeau Preparing Hors d’œuvres
Photograph by Discover Paris!

When we arrived, Eric and his staff were preparing savory dishes in the front kitchen.

Chef Sarah Tyler

Chef Sarah Tyler Prepares Macarons and Puff Pastries
Photograph by Discover Paris!

In the kitchen in the back, Pastry Chef Sarah Tyler was preparing macarons and puff pastries. As the front kitchen was crowded with eager, hungry guests, we decided to start in the back kitchen, eating dessert first, and then proceeding to the main courses. What a wonderful way to start partying!

Filling a macaron

Sarah Advises Monique on How to Fill a Macaron with Cream
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Sarah gave each of us careful instruction on how to fill macarons with cream from a pastry bag. We got to choose the flavor of the cream: chocolate, passion fruit, caramel, or orange blossom for the macarons and pistachio, praline, or Grand Marnier for the puff pastries.

Monique fills a macaron

Monique Filling a Macaron
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Monique deftly filled a macaron with caramel…and then another.

Caramel-filled macaron

Caramel-filled Macaron
Photograph by Discover Paris!

I filled a macaron with caramel, too. Is this yummy, or what?

Chefs at Cook'n With Class

Chefs Anton Gonzales, Eric Fraudeau, and Patrick Hebert in the Main Kitchen
Photograph by Discover Paris!

After eating our fill of pastries, it was time to return to the main kitchen, where Chefs Gonzales, Fraudeau, and Hebert were busy as bees preparing the courses.

Assortment of Dishes by the Cook’n With Class Chefs
Photographs by Discover Paris!

There was a wide variety of tasty dishes to choose from. From top to bottom, left to right: Camembert cheese with fig and ham; Fennel salad; Roulade of chicken and mushrooms; Pissaladière; Bouillabaisse; and Beef Bourguignon.

And then we met some great people:

Tony and Daisy from San Diego
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Veronica from Washington, DC and Sam from Maine
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Monique with Jackie from Greenwich, England
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Then it was time to award prizes…

Yetunde Shakes Her Casserole
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Party attendee’s business cards were placed in a casserole and several drawings were held.

Les Marchés Français by Brian Defehr and Pauline Boldt

Tom Wins Cookbook
Photograph by Discover Paris!

And I won a cookbook! Les Marchés Français — Four Seasons of French Dishes from the Paris Markets was written by one of the Cook’n With Class chefs, Brian Defehr. The book’s photographs are by Pauline Boldt.

Macaron class at Cook'n With Class

Monique Wins a Macaron Class at Cook’n With Class
Photograph by Discover Paris!

Monique won a prize, too! A certificate valid for a macaron class at the cooking school. I anticipate that she will blog about her experience there.

Then more desserts were served…

Assortment of Desserts

Assortment of Desserts
Photographs by Discover Paris!

From top to bottom: Hazelnut Birthday Cake, Lemon Meringue Pie, and Fig Tart.

Following dessert came the entertainment…

Musicians in the Pastry Kitchen
Photograph by Discover Paris!

A three-man ensemble played some of the weirdest music that I’ve ever heard, improvising on empty canisters and the oven.

The Staff at Cook'n With Class

The Staff of Cook’n With Class
Photograph by Discover Paris!

A good time was had by all, thanks to the staff at Cook’n With Class!

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The Taste of India is Not So Far Away! by Samantha Gilliams

Friday, August 11th, 2017
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There is no longer an excuse to skip over foreign ingredients in the Indian recipes you attempt! Velan, an Indian grocery store and wellness shop in the 10th arrondissement, has brought over all the spices and herbs necessary to make authentic Indian dishes at home.

Entrance of Velan Grocery Store
Photograph by Samantha Gilliams

Velan is situated in Passage Brady, an arcade filled with Indian restaurants and shops. Just steps from Strasbourg-Saint Denis, a quarter of Paris that hosts a diverse mix of people and cultures, Velan is one of the many businesses in Paris that are foreign yet embedded in the fabric of the city.

Left: Entrance to Passage – Right: Interior of Passage
Photographs by Samantha Gilliams

Velan caters to those who want authentic Indian ingredients and goods. They sell everything from Ayurvedic oils to hot green chilies to traditional Indian bangles. And the spices… They are all there.

Top: Ayurvedic Oils
Bottom Left: Jewelry – Bottom Right: Dried Goods

Photographs by Samantha Gilliams

I decided to purchase a few ingredients during my visit, as I was planning to host an Indian dinner party that night for friends with whom I traveled to southern India last December. I was able to find all the ingredients I needed to make the dishes that we ate at our hostel daily. Curry leaves, mustard seeds, lentils, spice mixes, naan (flatbread), coconut, okra… I used all these ingredients, plus some produce I picked up at another market, to make dinner for nine.

The ingredients I bought from left to right: whole coconut, MDH’s “Kitchen King” spice mix, sugar-coated fennel seeds, mustard seeds, idli mix, curry leaves, garlic naan, veggie chips, okra, turmeric, and lentils – Total cost: approx. 20€
Photograph by Samantha Gilliams

My friend Zoe, an ex-chef who had been in India with me, helped me prepare the dinner. We ended up making a vegetable curry with dal (using the MDH “Kitchen King” spice blend we bought at Velan), okra with a spicy tomato and chili sauce (similar to bhindi masala), buttery polenta with onions, mustard seeds, and curry leaves (inspired by Ven Pongal), and my favorite coconut chutney, from scratch.

All of the ingredients from Velan made it possible to make these dishes for nine people, in my 15-square meter studio apartment nonetheless!

Our Dinner!
Photograph by Samantha Gilliams

The dinner ended up being a lovely affair. The food was so comforting and a nice reminder of the flavors of my trip last December. I would recommend Velan to anyone who is missing or dreaming of the cuisine of India.

Velan
87, Passage Brady, 75010 Paris
velan.paris
01.42.46.06.06

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A Brunch Cruise on the Ourcq Canal

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015
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On the heels of the 4th of July boat cruise that we took with the Seine-Saint-Denis Tourist Office (our blog of July 5), we took another cruise last Saturday. This one was called Croisière brunch sur l’Ourcq avec les Marmites volantes, and it promised to be as fun as the first.

Our Cruise Boat - The Henri IV Photograph by sss.DiscoverParis.net

Our Cruise Boat – The Henri IV
Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Monique and I showed up at the Bassin de la Villette, the rendezvous point, at 11:15 a.m. A short time later, the boat pulled up to the dock.

Thomas Guillot Prepares to Greet Guests Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Thomas Guillot Prepares to Greet Guests
Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Thomas Guillot of the Seine-Saint-Denis Tourist Office greeted us as we climbed on board. We went to the upper deck to enjoy the view while the boat got ready to shove off!

Enjoying the View from the Top Deck Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Enjoying the View from the Top Deck while Waiting for the Boat to Shove Off
Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Lift Bridge on Rue de Crimée Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Lift Bridge on Rue de Crimée
Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Bridge Rising Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Bridge Rising
Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

The boat left the dock and we approached the lift bridge on rue de Crimée. The bridge rose, we passed under, and we were on our way!

Settling In for Brunch

Settling In for Brunch
Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Then came the signal that brunch was served, and we filed down to the dining room where the tables were already set.

What We Had for Brunch Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

What We Had for Brunch
Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Surprise! It was a vegetarian brunch! Here’s what we had –
Row one from left to right: Watermelon juice; Fresh country bread from La Conquête du Pain
Row two from left to right: Salad of carrot, red cabbage, white cabbage, pumpkin seed, and herbs; Salad of bulgar, beet, feta cheese, apricot, and parsley
Row three from left to right: Spanish omelet (potato tortilla); Fruit salad with white cheese and granola
Row four: Brownie with hazelnuts; carrot cake
Not pictured: Tomato gaspacho

Coffee and tea were available for free; wine and fruit juice were available for purchase.

It was a delicious, filling, and healthy meal.

Madalena Guerra with Her Marmites

Madalena Guerra with Her Marmites
Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Madalena Guerra - Lelio Lemoine

Madalena Guerra and Lelio Lemoine
Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Congratulations to Madalena Guerra and Lelio Lemoine, co-managers of Les Marmites Volantes, a restaurant that delivers freshly-made vegetarian and omnivore lunches to office workers in northeastern Paris. Sit-down dining at the restaurant is also available.

Rotonde de la Villette Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Rotonde de la Villette
Photograph by www.DiscoverParis.net

Returning to the Bassin de la Villette at the end of the cruise, we were treated to a spectacular view of the Rotonde de la Villette, one of the four remaining tax offices built by architect Claude Nicolas Ledoux in the 18th century .

A good time was had by all!

Special note: The Seine-Saint-Denis Tourist Office has organized other brunch cruises for the summer. Check out their Web site: http://www.tourisme93.com/visites/2002-6846-croisiere-brunch-sur-l-ourcq.html

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Which Dining Guide Do Most French Waitresses Recommend to Paris-bound Travelers?

Saturday, March 21st, 2015
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Waitress Admiring Our E-book

We like to think that the dining guide most French waitresses recommend is our new e-book Dining Out in Paris – What You Need to Know before You Get to the City of Light.

Entering into a restaurant in Paris can be a formidable experience for the uninitiated traveler. Not only do you have to contend with trying to make your wishes understood by a waiter or waitress who may or may not speak your language, but you must learn quickly how to adapt to local dining customs as well.

If you are a first- or second-time traveler to Paris, our new e-book, Dining Out in Paris – What You Need to Know before You Get to the City of Light, will provide you the with the knowledge and confidence that you need to enter into a Parisian restaurant to enjoy a fine meal and to have a wonderful dining experience.

Bonus!
Dining Out in Paris – What You Need to Know before You Get to the City of Light contains in-depth reviews of twelve of the author’s favorite restaurants.

Click here to order! http://amzn.to/1nkgCyu

Note: You don’t need a Kindle device to read Dining Out in Paris. Amazon.com provides FREE reader apps that work on every major tablet, smartphone, and computer so that you can read e-books on whatever type of device you own. Click here to learn more.

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Dining Out in Paris – What You Need to Know about the New French Law

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014
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Fait_maison_logo

Effective January 1st, a new French law takes effect that will change the way you select your food in French restaurants. On that date, all restaurants in France (whether they claim to prepare homemade dishes or not) will be required to indicate somewhere in the restaurant the definition of what a homemade dish is:

Les plats « faits maison » sont élaborés sur place à partir de produits bruts.

This sentence states that homemade dishes are those that have been prepared in-house from raw products.

Bringing consistency to the restaurant industry, the law goes on to state what comprises a homemade dish:

• “Prepared in-house” means that the raw products arrive from a supplier for elaboration in the kitchen of the restaurant.

• “Raw products” means that each element of the dish arrives at the restaurant in a raw state. It cannot have undergone cooking or transformation by other processes or have been mixed with other products that might have transformed it from its natural state.

However, the term “raw products” does not mean that the produce must arrive fresh from the farm. Between the farm and the restaurant, food items can undergo certain processes that do not affect their basic nature. Examples include cleaning, peeling (except for potatoes), slicing, cutting, deboning, shelling, grinding, milling, smoking, and salting, or processes that preserve them from spoilage, such as refrigeration, freezing, or sealing them in vacuum packs.

Recognizing that it would be impractical to impose the requirement that chefs make all of their ingredients in-house, the law goes on to list products that may be used even though they have undergone transformation from their natural state:

• Cured fish and sausage, but not terrines or pâtés
• Cheese, milk, sour cream, animal fat
• Bread, flour, and cookies
• Dried or candied vegetables and fruit
• Pasta and cereal
• Raw sauerkraut
• Rising agents, sugar, and gelatin
• Condiments, spices, herbs, concentrates, chocolate, coffee, tea
• Syrup, wine, alcohol, and liqueurs
• Blanched offal
• Raw puff pastry
• Fowl, fish, and meat stocks, subject to informing the consumer of their use.

Restaurants that claim to make homemade dishes must identify these dishes on their menus either with the notation “Fait maison” or with the “Fait maison” image (a roof of a house over a frying pan). Restaurants that claim that all of their dishes are homemade may indicate that fact before each dish or indicate it in a unique spot on the menu.

This new law has already provoked controversy in the restaurant industry, with some chefs wondering whether important ingredients that they have been using fall under the list of exceptions. Some wonder how homemade dishes they normally prepare that are accompanied with a transformed element that is not an exception might qualify under the law. An example of such a case would be a homemade crêpe served with an industrially-produced jam.

As for consumers, the new law should go a long way to remove the doubt about whether a dish that they order in a restaurant in France is homemade or not.

On your next trip to Paris, be sure to look for the “fait maison” logo when you dine out.

Bon appétit!

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Which Dining Guide Do Most French Waitresses Recommend to Give as a Gift to Paris-bound Travelers for Christmas?

Saturday, December 20th, 2014
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We like to think that the dining guide most French waitresses recommend for Christmas is our new e-book Dining Out in Paris – What You Need to Know before You Get to the City of Light.

Entering into a restaurant in Paris can be a formidable experience for uninitiated travelers. Not only do they have to contend with trying to make their wishes understood by a waiter who may or may not speak their language, but they must learn quickly how to adapt to local dining customs as well.

First- or second-time travelers to Paris will appreciate Dining Out in Paris because it will provide them with the knowledge and confidence that they need to enter into a Parisian restaurant to enjoy a fine meal and to have a wonderful dining experience. As an additional bonus, the book contains in-depth reviews of twelve of the author’s favorite restaurants.

Click here to order! http://amzn.to/1nkgCyu

Note: A Kindle reader is not required to read Dining Out in Paris – What You Need to Know before You Get to the City of Light. Amazon.com provides FREE reader apps that work on every major tablet, smartphone, and computer. Click here to learn more.

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